Tag Archives: india

Monkey Bar – Review

Monkeying around in Monkey Bar – Kolkata

On a lazy Sunday afternoon me and my friend were walking around Camac street when we happened to see a board for Monkey Bar near the Fort Knox building. I instantly knew Monkey Bar is finally in Kolkata. I had been a great fan of Monkey Bar during my days in Delhi and couldn’t wait to get in there.

The restaurant is located on the 9th Floor of the Fort Knox building, The building has a very tiny lift that took me to the 9th floor and a big entry door to the Bar awaited us there. The moment I entered it was such a relief to see high ceilings and a huge sitting area unlike the tiny lift that took us up to the building.

The Space: The place is divided into 3 sections as such, one with high tables with a stunning view of the Victoria Memorial on a clear day. The other side is the normal table of 4s and 2s. And the more beautiful section is the outdoor seating section, it ought to be the best place to sit on a lovely winter afternoon. I loved how high the ceiling and the space is and how airy the entire place felt so high above.

Food and Drinks: Now coming to the main part the food and drinks, I was pretty impressed by the Kolkata touch in the menu, drinks like ‘Toast to Kolkata’ & the very hilariously named ‘Trump card’ really got me amused. Although I tried Mama’s Girl and Curry Martini,  I must say both were equally refreshing with the right amount of alcohol. They of course have the usual beer, rum, whisky as well but I was too tempted to try the new cocktails.

A lot of RED! Mama’s Girl along with other things red, pun intended!
A refreshing watermelon and cucumber cocktail!
Martini along with – Love what is says – Lime is the new Mustard
The must have – Med Platter

About the food now, just like the drinks, the food menu is very tempting too. I was so happy to see the variety of cuisines like Mediterranean, continental, of course Indian served with their own take added to it. I opted for the Med platter, a lip-smacking wholesome meal, their signature Futterfly, mushroom bruschetta and liver on toast. Does not just the sound of it water your mouth!

Watch-out for: I know that I have already said a lot of good things about the place (which they deserve), although a couple of things that did not please me much were, as the evening grew and more and more people started dropping by, the music decibel started going higher and higher, to the point where I was almost screaming to be able to chat with my friend. I should add though that when requested the staff did turn down the volume a tad bit, so that helps.

Pocket Pinch: I have to admit the hit on the pocket is on an expensive side. A meal for a couple with drinks would cost something around Rs 2000 plus.

All in all I think this place is one of those that the city had been waiting for a long time. And what more could we want than a lovely evening over looking the Victoria with amazing drinks and delicious food.

Email: wheelsinpink@gmail.com for collab!

What not to expect from the French colony of India – Pondicherry

India has a touch of so many worlds, it has got a place for all cultures, people and religion and it is always a visual treat to witness such an amalgamation. One such place is Pondicherry, after years of wanting to visit this place, last month (February 2017) I finally found myself in this tiny French colony of Pondicherry.
How to Reach: Best way to reach is to travel to Pondicherry from Chennai. Chennai is at a distance of approx 170 kms. By bus or car its takes 3-4 hours. Best and cheapest option is to travel by bus, bus tickets range from Rs 100 – 400 depending on the type of bus. For a more comfortable journey you can hire a car for an expensive fare of Rs 3000 one way.
What not to expect in Pondicherry: 
Well, to be honest when we hear about Pondicherry we picture pastel colored French buildings and architecture, lovely bakeries and a hip culture. Upon visiting this place I realized that this is only partially true.
This is not GOA: Sometimes Pondy is compared to Goa due to its beautiful beaches and influx of foreign tourists. But unlike Goa, Pondy doesnot have shacks like Goa, nor a late night pub or club culture. The beach side cafes and restaurants close at 10:00 PM dot. The ones not beach facing have a buffer of 1 hour and close at 11:00 PM exact.
‘Tiny’ French colony: The most popular part of Pondy is indeed very very small with a capital S. The rest of Pondy except Heritage town in pretty much like a typical, regular south indian city,  so do not expect an extensive French town full of beautiful buildings.
Early nights: Pondy is not the best for the lazy souls. The beach side restaurants shut down at 10:00 pm dot or else expect to be almost thrown out. If you wish to push your nights a bit longer past 10 pm, best bet would be to dine and wine at one of the not so beach side cafes\restaurants to be able to chill till 11 pm. But! Do expect an annoying waiter to be over your shoulder every 10 mins reminding you its time to leave once it is past 11  pm
Language problem: In case you are not  able to find a hotel or accommodation in Heritage town, be ready to struggle a bit, well lets make it quite a bit owing to the prominent language problem. Hindi and English are not commonly spoken except for specific areas in Pondy. I being an Indian had a tough time moving around in the city, imagine what it might have been for someone not from the country.
A teeny weeny bit less hospitable: Okay this is only my personal opinion and no one needs to agree with it, also maybe these opinions are due to specific experiences I had, but nevertheless somehow I had instances in restaurants and hotels where I faced some reluctance or lack of warmth while addressing lets say an issue I was facing. Maybe its the influx of foreign tourists and dollars that has attributed to this or something else I am not too sure about.
I would like to add that hope this post does not discourage anyone from travelling to Pondy, rather it should help you from getting disappointed by setting the right expectations about this tiny lazy extremely pretty French city of Pondicherry.

The Indian “Great Wall of China” – Kumbhalgarh Fort, Rajasthan, India

Things you need to know before visiting the Kumbhalgarh Fort:

  • The place usually gets very crowded during peak season (September – March), so make sure to reach early to be able to have a not-so-rushed visit
  • The stairs inside the Fort are pretty steep and narrow, so be careful, not very convenient for people who have problem with small spaces (claustrophobia)
  • Take a guide who can help you around the Fort to not get lost. Do bargain
  • The walk up to the Fort is pretty steep, so be well equipped with proper walking shoes and a water bottle since it could be exhausting
  • Being at the Fort during sunset is one of the best things to do, since it is a captivating view
  • You might consider watching the Light and Sound show in the evening, although it is too much of talk and less about the Fort, watch at own risk (it is in Hindi language though!)
  • Eat properly before going up there, since to walk around the Fort properly is pretty time consuming
  • Mornings and Evenings are best time to visit

 

What you need to know about the’GREAT WALL OF INDIA’:

For the longest time we only knew about The Great Wall of China and its history, but we have a close counterpart in India as well which happens to be the Second Longest Wall in the world after The Great Wall of China. Unknown to the outside world for a very long time, this place is now gaining popularity, Kumbhalgarh Fort in Rajasthan, India also referred t now as the GREAT WALL OF INDIA.

Built in the early 15th century by the Great Maharana Kumbha and further extended in the 19th century, this fort is also where The Great King & warrior of Mewar, Maharana Pratap was born. History has it that this is the invincible Fort which could not be conquered even by the mighty Mughals alone, only together with the armies of Delhi, Amber and Marwar they were able to break through the Fort. This Fort is a standing icon of the bold and unbreakable Rajput glory and spirit.

The Fort is a safely protected by the massive snake like meandering Fort Wall which is 15 kms long and 1150 m to 1200 m in height, the wall is as thick as 12-25 feet and broad enough to allow an army of eight horses to ride abreast. It runs through the mountain cliffs and valleys of the Aravalli ranges sometimes going uphill or taking a descent structured with long walk ways, stairs and seven huge gates. Also within the Wall it guards 360 temples. Along with the Fort the Wall encompasses around some of the forest ranges of the Kumbhalgarh National Park which helps in the safe keeping of a few Indian endangered species, it is home to the famous panthers & leopards of India and also a variety of other wildlife. The Wall is an standing proof of the brilliant architecture from the Rajput era, built with such brilliance that even after 700 years of its being it still stands tall unmoved. It is this wall that is known as the second longest continuous wall on the planet after the ‘Great Wall of China’.

 

 

What not to expect from the French city of India – Pondicherry

India has a touch of so many worlds, it has got a place for all cultures, people and religion and it is always a visual treat to witness such an amalgamation. One such place is Pondicherry, after years of wanting to visit this place, last month (February 2017) I finally found myself in this tiny French colony of Pondicherry.

How to Reach: Best way to reach is to travel to Pondicherry from Chennai. Chennai is at a distance of approx 170 kms. By bus or car its takes 3-4 hours. Best and cheapest option is to travel by bus, bus tickets range from Rs 100 – 400 depending on the type of bus. For a more comfortable journey you can hire a car for an expensive fare of Rs 3000 one way.

Matri mandir in Auroville

What not to expect in Pondicherry: 

Well, to be honest when we hear about Pondicherry we picture pastel colored French buildings and architecture, lovely bakeries and a hip culture. Upon visiting this place I realized that this is only partially true.

This is not GOA: Sometimes Pondy is compared to Goa due to its beautiful beaches and influx of foreign tourists. But unlike Goa, Pondy doesnot have shacks like Goa, nor a late night pub or club culture. The beach side cafes and restaurants close at 10:00 PM dot. The ones not beach facing have a buffer of 1 hour and close at 11:00 PM exact.

‘Tiny’ French colony: The most popular part of Pondy is indeed very very small with a capital S. The rest of Pondy except Heritage town in pretty much like a typical, regular south indian city,  so do not expect an extensive French town full of beautiful buildings.

Early nights: Pondy is not the best for the lazy souls. The beach side restaurants shut down at 10:00 pm dot or else expect to be almost thrown out. If you wish to push your nights a bit longer past 10 pm, best bet would be to dine and wine at one of the not so beach side cafes\restaurants to be able to chill till 11 pm. But! Do expect an annoying waiter to be over your shoulder every 10 mins reminding you its time to leave once it is past 11  pm

Language problem: In case you are not  able to find a hotel or accommodation in Heritage town, be ready to struggle a bit, well lets make it quite a bit owing to the prominent language problem. Hindi and English are not commonly spoken except for specific areas in Pondy. I being an Indian had a tough time moving around in the city, imagine what it might have been for someone not from the country.

A teeny weeny bit less hospitable: Okay this is only my personal opinion and no one needs to agree with it, also maybe these opinions are due to specific experiences I had, but nevertheless somehow I had instances in restaurants and hotels where I faced some reluctance or lack of warmth while addressing lets say an issue I was facing. Maybe its the influx of foreign tourists and dollars that has attributed to this or something else I am not too sure about.

I would like to add that hope this post does not discourage anyone from travelling to Pondy, rather it should help you from getting disappointed by setting the right expectations about this tiny lazy extremely pretty French city of Pondicherry.

 

 

Jodhpur – The spectacular Blue city of India

Who doesn’t like palaces, camels rides, royality and feeling like a prince or a princess in some ancient place. We all love to think of it and maybe visit such a place and indulge in the stories behind it. Rajasthan in India is such a place, full of palaces, deserts, sand dunes, vibrant clothes and lovely music and folk dance. Although Rajasthan is very big and each city is equally different and beautiful, for the last month on 2016 I was lucky to be in Rajasthan and visited Jodhpur.

‘Must do’s’ in Jodhpur:

Camping in the desert: The spectacular Thar Desert is spread across Jodhpur, and one of the best things to do in Jodhpur is to indulge in the Desert experience. There are quite a few Camps and Resorts in the vicinity of Jodhpur city. You could either stay in the Resorts; for a more indulgent experience stay in one of the Deserts camps on the sand dunes. The camps offer various types of stay packages equipped with meals, you can also opt for a Camel safari – a must do; as well as the Jeep safari for a more thrilling feel; best taken in the evening or early morning. http://ourlittletravelbook.com/review-thar-oasis-jodhpur/

Thar Oasis Resort – The resort we stayed in
Swimming pool inside the Resort

Dining in the desert: There can be no experience more etching in the memory as that of dining under the expanse of the starriest skies in the middle of the desert, served along with traditional Rajasthani folk dance and music. The set ups are usually ethereal with sofas lined up around the performance area along with bonfire. The hospitality is usually impeccable with great service of starters and drinks being served during the performance and the dinner is usually served indoors.

Drinks and snacks served before dinner in the desert
Rajasthani Dance performance

Explore Mehrangarh Fort: Without doubt Mehrangarh Fort is the best place in Jodhpur. Perfectly perched on the hill top it is as picturesque as can be. Invincible and one of the more prominent forts in India constructed by Rao Jodha way back in 1459 AD. It is an art and architecture lover’s heaven. Throughout done with extreme detailing, the grandeur of the Fort is extraordinary. The entire Blue City of Jodhpur is visible from the Mehrangarh Fort.

Sunset from Mehrangarh Fort
Mehrangarh Fort
Architecture of Mehrangarh Fort
Huge weapons of all sizes on display inside Mehrangarh Fort

Ivory jewellery on display in a store in Mehrangarh Fort

Admire the Umaid Bhawan Palace: The Palace is placed on the highest point of the city and is comparatively more recent, being constructed in 1929. The palace represents a mix of Indian and European architecture, with 347 rooms, it is one of the largest private residences in the world and is partially also the residence to the former royal family, while the remaining part is a museum and the other owned by Taj Palace Hotel.

Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jodhpur

Obsess over a Rajasthani Thali: Being in Rajasthan and not obsessing over Rajasthani food is a crime. The best way to do so is to fill your stomach with the elaborate spread of food served in a Rajasthani thali. Look out for dal baati churma, gattey ki sabzi, makkey ki roti, panchmel ki Subzi, kheench, moong dal halwa all of which are local delicacies. For the most amazing thali go to Gypsy Restaurant in Jodhpur city. Other options for great food are Shandar Sweet home, for great ambience & food are Hanwant Mahal, Indique & On the Rocks.

The elaborate Rajasthani Thali

Try the Local street food: Personally I have to say, do try the Pani puri or golgappas here. There are like nothing you have ever eaten before. Served with a choice of 5 pani options (watery dip) like sweet, hing, imli and others they are just mind blowing. Also try the super spicy Mirchi Vada to ignite your taste buds.

The famous Mirchi Vada

Shopping: Just like Rajasthani food, the things to shop on offer are equally tempting. Surrounding the Clock Tower is the bustling bazaar, Sardar Market. Everything starting from home décor, jutis(shoes), silver jewellery & Bandhej sarees in vibrant colors can be found here. Personally my opinion is that the most economical and best quality shopping can be done from National Handloom Cooperation on Nai Sarak, it is like a one stop shop for all things in one place for really affordable prices.

How to reach Jodhpur:

By Air – Jodhpur has its own domestic airport located at 5 kms from the city and is well connected with all important metro cities. Flights from Delhi, Mumbai, Jaipur, Udaipur and other important Indian cities serve Jodhpur on a daily basis. Cabs and autos are available outside the airport and can be hired to travel to any part of the city.

By Train: Jodhpur is well connected by train will all major cities.

By Road: Direct buses both luxury such as Volvo & state buses ply from Delhi and Jaipur. The Roads are very well maintained and one can also drive from the nearby cities.

 

Durga Puja in Kolkata: A photo journal

Christmas in New York, the Rio Carnival in Brazil and La Tomatino festival in Spain all put together cannot beat the madness and magnitude of Durga Puja celebrations in Kolkata, India. It is almost impossible to pen down the experience in words, and if I do it would be a never ending post I am sure. To save all the trouble, here is my photo and video journal of my experience of visiting the stunning pandal in Kolkata during Durga Puja 2016 made with immense artistic work and manual intricate labour, it is an art kingdom on its own and would be any art lovers ticket to paradise:

Pandal in the shape of huge Manipuri dancers of India in Bosepukur Talbagan:

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Tribal themed Durga Puja pandal in Tridhara Sammilani Sarbojanin:

The very famous and popularized World’s 1st Durga goddess with 1000 hands in Deshapriya Park:

Bhutan themed Durga idol and pandal in New Alipore Suruchi Sangha:

I do not remember the name of the place but the decor was made out of plastic dusting brushes, pretty unique and colorful:

Amusing figure of Ravana from the sky in Kendua Shanti Sangha club:

The Bengali wedding themed pandal in Bosepukur Sitala Mandir:

Themed on a famous Bengali poem showcasing cartoon figure like village theme in Jodhpur Park:

Mesmerizing serene and calm idol of Durga in  Naktala Udayan Sangha depecting peace within chaos:

The outside pandal decor was that of chaos while the inside was calm

Old Kolkata city themed Durga Puja idol and pandal in 66 Pally Sarbojanin Durga Puja:

A divine pandal with decor of stone pebbles dropping fromt the sky in Badamtala Ashar Sangha Durga Puja pandal:

Intricate work and detailing on the pandal with dry fruit shells, wood shavings and betel nuts in Jatra Suru Sangha Durga Puja Pandal:

So next Durga Puja book your tickets to Kolkata to indulge in art of the most beautiful kind and admire the hard work and labor that goes behind these stunning pandals.

Kashmir: At the time of Curfew – Part II

Day 2: Sonmarg

I had planned a more elaborate trip to Kashmir, but upon discussions with locals and the drivers I understood that Pahalgam and Gulmarg were not a safe place to travel during the ongoing curfew since it was pretty disturbed at the moment with stonepelting still continuing. Gulmarg which is famous for the Gondola ride was closed for close to 2 months at the moment. I also had a couple of days of stay booked in Pahalgam. Considering all this I dropped my plan to go to these places and instead decided to go to Sonmarg and  stay back in Srinagar for a day longer and made a plan change to go to Jammu instead. So on my 2nd day I headed to Sonmarg in the wee hours at 4:30 am, since usually everyone is asleep at that time and it helps avoid any commotion on the road that might happen during day time. So we travelled in the dark and on empty roads and it took us around 3 hours to reach Sonmarg with a few toilet and tea breaks in between. So by 7:30 am we reached Sonmarg. The air was cold and fresh and the view was magical. The sun had risen and its warmth was so comforting. After having my breakfast at a local stall.

I understood that usually one would hire a horse and a rider to take me uphill. So after negotiating we decided on Rs 1400 for a horse ride up and down the hill. As per locals this was a very cheap rate given the low tourist footfall. And so at around 8:30 am my splendid ride began with my horse named ‘Heer’ who was just 4 years old and quite a girl, she would gallop atimes and walk on the all the possible loose edges of the hill although there were broad paved roads right beside them, almost giving me a heart attack. Apparently the horses prefer to walk on the edges I was told.Phew!!!

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A herd of sheeps grazing at the foothills
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my pretty ride for the day ‘Heer’
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Beautiful valley

I should admit that within no time I and Heer befriended each other and soon the rider let me and her take the lead on our way up. Soon I was comfortable enough to be clicking pictures and enjoying my ride. We crossed locations where the recent movie ‘Bajrangi Bhaijan’ was shoot (Bollywood movie) and few others the horse keeper named that I don’t remember now. Soon we reached the drop off point from where I climbed a bit of the hill by foot where a huge cave was formed out of stacked frozen ice. After clicking some pictures, having some tea and snacks and resting a bit, while Heer had some water to herself we headed back downhill.

Once we reached I patted my beautiful black horse and bit adieu to the rider who too was a real nice person although we didn’t talk much during our ride. By the time we were back it was around 12:00pm and lunchtime.

I was interested in having Wazwan which is Kashmiri cuisine and I did find a comfortable local restaurant serving them luckily, unlike many which were closed and serving just basic food. I ordered Rista which is basically mutton balls in spicy gravy to be had with rice. After a good and super spicy wazwan we headed back. I stopped by for a bit of shopping at a government store on the way, where I also relaxed a little and had some kashmiri tea: Kahwa which is a specialty. This too was a great place to shop and more so since the shopkeeper was very sweet.

Finally at around 6 pm I was back at my house boat and the roads had a little more people than the day before, a few more shops were open. I rested a while and decided to go out for a stroll. It was comforting to see that a few shops were selling samosas and breads, was I walked down further I came across a big hospital due to which there were vans selling biryani and fried chicken. So yes, post 6 pm life was a little better than the morning for the locals here, I also saw a park fun of kids playing and I wished that the crisis in Kashmir would end soon.

Expenses:

Srinagar to Sonmarg by car and back: Exorbitant Rs 6000, due to the curfew. Usually they charge Rs 2500.

Sonmarg horse ride uphill and down: Rs 1400 per horse, usually during normal situation its more.

Continued…

Kashmir: At the time of Curfew

I have seen Kashmir in Bollywood movies and always wondered when I would get that chance to go there. It seemed like a piece of Europe in my own country India, enormous mountains, tall pine trees, rivers running in between the valleys, blue skies, shikara rides, gorgeous looking people and so much more beauty all in one place.

So I booked my flight and hotel tickets way back in the month of May to travel to Kashmir in September. September being a busy season in Kashmir and when I had booked my tickets in May the hotels were almost getting sold out. But as my luck would have it, curfew struck Kashmir in July. All the news channels and newspapers were flooded with news about the curfew. So I waited for a few months until August to check back on the situation, unfortunately not much had changed. Came September and a few days left for me to travel to Kashmir and by then the curfew had been on more that 50 days. With uncertainty and my wish to visit Kashmir, not knowing when next I would get a chance to travel to this beautiful place I decided to go ahead with my plans. I definitely did receive a lot of ‘are you crazy to go there now?’ type statements from various people I know. And so I did go..

As a result during my time is curfew stricken Kashmir I did end up busting a few myths about how Kashmir really is during curfew..Here is a detailed account of my days in Kashmir during curfew.

Day 1:

With an anxious heart and partially worried head I finally arrived at the Srinagar airport. I was greeted with the impact of curfew the moment I landed in the Srinagar Airport. While I was waiting for my luggage to arrive I happened to get acquainted with a local woman from there living in Delhi, we started chatting and boom came the question ‘What brings you to Srinagar?’, when she heard I was there travelling for leisure, she was totally livid! How could I plan to travel to Kashmir during the curfew, my reply as usual was that my tickets were booked way in advance and I wanted to take the chance. This was just one of those many discouraging conversations that followed later during my days in Kashmir.

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view from the flight

My houseboat owner arranged for my travel to the houseboat from the airport. On my way to the houseboat I noticed that all roads were totally barren and all the shops were closed. Except for the army personals there were no other people on the roads and not even one shop was open.  I reached my house boat and was greeted by the keeper with a warm smile. After taking some rest I discussed with the hotel people on what are the places I could visit.

The Mughal Gardens:

So for my first day I visited the Mughal Gardens. There are 4 gardens which make it up to the Mughal gardens. I would say a few of the gardens were beautiful with lovely blossoms of various kinds, although don’t expect too much, I must admit I was a little disappointed by a few too. None the less all of them are well maintained and have a heritage value so these are more than just gardens and rather monuments, lets put it that way.

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At the Mughal Garden
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All the lovely flowers in the Mughal gardens

Sankaracharya temple:

Next I went to the Sankaracharya temple, it’s a beautiful climb up the hills, it’s a 800 year old temple, clean and very well maintained, due to the curfew it was ONLY me who was there at that time, there were no tourists at all. And I loved the experience to be able to take in all the beauty all by myself. I realized I had not been in so much silence in a long time. The view from the top is breathtaking, the entire Dal lake and Srinagar could be seen from above, the peace and serenity of the place is contagious, I wish they would have let me click a picture of the view, I could not click any since it is a high security zone and cameras and phones are not allowed.

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Adoring the beautiful view from the view point on the way to Shankaracharya Temple

Sunset at Dal Lake:

On my way down, I spent some time at the Dal lake. The sun was setting and it was a mesmerizing view to behold, as the sun was setting the shikaras formed a silhouette and a perfect vision to take away with me for life.

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Mesmerizing sunset at Dal Lake

Shopping:

I planned to shop a little and since most of the shops were closed, our taxi driver took me to an underground store belonging to the co-operative, I must say the place was a steal, huge collection and very reasonably priced.  I almost bought everything in the shop! It should be a must visit place for anyone who plans to go shopping. I retired to the houseboat after this, on my way back I could see a few shops were open since the curfew would usually last from 6am – 6pm. Few shops were open and for a change I could see some locals on the streets which was welcoming to see. Although my plan to dine somewhere outside failed since all the eating places were shut down. So I settled in for a homely dinner at the house boat. I did enjoy my first day in curfew stricken Kashmir.

Details:

Airport to Houseboat transfer: Rs 500

Day tour of Srinagar: Rs 1500

Continued in Part II…Coming soon!

What not to miss in Darjeeling

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Darjeeling is absolutely one of my most favorite hill stations in India, the charm of this place is elegant and gracious. In my previous post I was busy admiring this place and only had enough time to write about my first impressions once I reached Darjeeling. Now it has been a week of me staying here and I think I am finally ready to write about what are the absolute have-to-visit or have-to-do places in Darjeeling. While I sip on to my cup of tea sitting here in the valley facing CCD cafe, join me in as I pen down my personal favorites here.


Momos
Ah!!! The momos one can eat in Darjeeling is unmatched. I don’t remember ever eating such heavenly momos anywhere else. The momos are served with red hot spicy sauce and a very clear chicken soup. The best ones I found where in the small dingy road side eateries lined up on the road around the Darjeeling railway station run by local people. No! do not get skeptical by looking at these places, they might look really shabby from the outside, the places are usually clean and really tiny with just enough space for 6-8 people to fit in but it’s the food they put on your plate that will leave you wanting for more. This is where I went and then went there again for 3 consecutive days and had my itinerary permitted I would have gone there everyday.

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Glenarys
The most famous bakery in town, also known as the Glenary’s Cake Shop is located at the ground floor of a beautiful white colonial building, its a typical British colonial building and very near to the Mall road. While the Restaurant is located upstairs, the bakery is on the lower floor, go there for the yummy breakfast, rolls, pies, pizzas, pastries, fruit & rum cakes and also freshly baked breads. The view from the cafe is breath-taking. Order a pot of Darjeeling tea and it almost feels like having a cup on tea sitting on the clouds. Also lookout for the red telephone booth, a perfect selfie location

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Red telephone booth inside the cafe
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Placed in one of the corners in the cafe
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View from Glenarys bakery

The Restaurant is equally regal and beautiful, famous for its continental food, order with a glass of wine to enjoy the feel for colonial life.

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Wine for three 🙂 @Glenarys
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Restaurant in Glenarys on a casual evening

Keventers

Popular for being featured in some of the recent Bollywood movies, it is located facing the Clock tower. I have never had a sausage platter so big and so huge in my life. A foodies paradise. USP huge quantity, sausage platter for breakfast with breads and Darjeeling tea. Overlooks the clock tower. The terrace is the best place to find a table.

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The famous sausage platter
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View from the terrace in Keventers
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Look out for one of the ship shaped building from the terrace in Keventers

Mall Road

As many hill stations in India, Darjeeling too has the mall road lined up with shops selling rich authentic local handicrafts and jewellery. I bargained to buy really gorgeous jewellery and artifacts

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The usual scene from Mall Road

Toy Train

Well Toy Train is heritage and a ticket is hard to find unless booked in advance and pretty damn expensive too. My advice ditch the Toy train, take a train from Darjeeling station to Ghoom and back to get a flavor of the a train journey on the hills by the tea gardens. (Although this is my personal opinion)

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The world famous Toy Train
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Ghoom or Ghum Railway station

Mountaineering Institute & Zoo

Usually I don’t do the usual places like zoo when visiting a place, but this one is different. The Mountaineering Institute houses all the clothes and equipments used by the very first climber Tenzing Norgay and their team and also a detailed description of the route and their journey followed by them. In the Zoo specifically look out for the Red Panda lazying around.

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Himalayan Zooligical park
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The super lazy Red Panda

Rope-way ride

The  Cable Car is a must see only because it allows majestic views of the acres of the tea garden which looks like a green carpet from above. To me it seemed like a trip into a Jurassic Park scenario. We reached  here to board the cable car from Singamari which is approx. 3kms away from Darjeeling Chowk Bazaar.
The ride is about 45 minutes and on an altitude of about 7,000 ft. down to 800 ft. where the last station Singla Bazar is located.

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View from the rope way on rainy day
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The green carpets of tea garden from the rope way as can be seen below
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Into the clouds

Cup of Darjeeling Tea

And finally nothing beats having cup after cups of Darjeeling tea sitting in Darjeeling. The Mall road is lined up with tea cafe come shops like Nathmulls , Golden Tips which serves Darjeeling tea plus all forms of tea related things like cups, sets, pots etc. Look out for the tea cups with strainers with beautiful dragon paintings on it.(below pictures taken in Nathmulls)

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This is a tiny tea set, one of the many beautiful things available in the tea shops
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Alas! Darjeeling Tea


Darjeeling – My Muse

Darjeeling – My Muse

As a kid I remember waking up to the beautiful aroma of Darjeeling tea everyday along with morning chatter and my Dad sipping on to it while reading the newspaper. It is since then that ‘Darjeeling‘ has enchanted me. When I grew up, inevitably I too took to this drink as my favorite cup of tea. I had visited Darjeeling on many occasions earlier as a kid but that was more of a holiday with family. This year I am visiting Darjeeling again after 12 years, but this time it is with a different mindset, it is with the knowledge that this is the place which was the reason for my morning enchantment as a kid and continues to be, it is  with desire to see the hills that bear them.

Darjeeling is classically beautiful, it is beauty that never ages, it is evergreen  and elegant.

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Sign board on the road way up the hills

As I drove up towards Darjeeling from the Bagdogra Airport in a taxi few hours ago, the spiral hilly roads only added to my anticipation of seeing this old colonial hill city yet again, which was once the summer resort for the British during their rule in India. It is the British influence that I could immediately seen once I reached Darjeeling.

I will skip the part on where and which hotel I checked into because I will detail about my hotel & details of my stay in a following blog post as and when I travel around Darjeeling, since Darjeeling cannot be talked about in only one blog post. In this post I only want to sink into admiring this hill city right now as I stand there. I checked into my hotel a while ago, it is almost sun down now. In the same airport taxi I got dropped off at the next place I could not wait to get to, the Mall Road. Mall Road is a small stretch of road which ends with a huge open space with a stage at the very end which has an enormous live screen playing amazing music videos along side it. The place is busy with tourists and locals lazying around either sitting on the side benches or on the stairs to the stage. There are many horse keepers ready with their horses to take people for a ride around the mall road for a nominal charge. The place is so infectious as if it is inviting me to come, sit, stay and just stop for a while and take a break. Just down the road is the ‘Clock Tower’ with this huge clock standing tall in the heart of the city. It immediately reminded me of some Bollywood movies that were shot around the clock tower (latest Bollywood movie being ‘Barfi‘).

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Clock Tower in Mall Road

As I strolled past the several antique stores by the road the clouds came descending down to kiss me as if to say ‘you are welcome back’.  There is a CCD cafe right in the heart of the mall road facing the valley below.

For now I am sipping onto a lovely cup of Darjeeling tea sitting on a couch telling you all about my first few hours in Darjeeling, while I watch the clouds form a garland in the valley below and I contemplate on my itinerary for my stay of next few days in these hills whom I call ‘My Muse‘.

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Garland of clouds as clicked from the CCD cafe